You’ve done your research online and know what city you’d like to live in once you move to Japan. You’re thinking, “Should I learn Japanese if I want to go to Japan?” as you scroll through a frightening block of indecipherable kanji.

Many people wonder, “Why learn Japanese?” instantly contemplate the language’s enigmatic syntax and the numerous cultural norms that go along with it. Japanese has nothing to do with hieroglyphs or calligraphy, despite what you may have heard.

The majority of Japanese language students are motivated to learn the language by personal, professional, or cultural ties to Japan. You only have to think about all the people who translate anime, TV shows, and the cuisine you order at your favorite restaurant to realize how important it is to learn Japanese if you want to have a successful career and fully appreciate all the unique aspects of this fantastic Asian country. 

There is a lot of debate even among foreigners who have lived in Japan for a long time. There is no clear solution to this problem, but hopefully this blog post will shed some light on where we stand and why.

Benefits of Learning Japanese

If you work in localisation or a related field, learning a new language will undoubtedly help your career. There are other upsides to studying a foreign language, such as Japanese.

Diverse and Original Views on Business Management

Knowing Japanese, the language of the world’s third-largest economy opens doors in international business management and the finance industry. It should come as no surprise that those who can translate between Japanese and other languages are always in demand. In the land of the rising sun, it is common for natives to avoid using foreign languages, including English when conducting business or working with related paperwork.

It Guarantees Job Promotion

This is apparent, but not in the way you’re thinking. If you know Japanese for business, you will be more valuable to potential employers and customers worldwide. Your potential customers or partners in Japan will appreciate your efforts to learn either business Japanese or even simply the basics of greetings in the language.

You’ll Begin To Appear Friendly

Learning business Japanese should be something other than your main objective. If you have never lived in Japan, you may be surprised that few Japanese people speak English fluently. And even among those who know English, the vast majority avoid using it. A simple “Hai!” Even if you only know a little Japanese, it will go a long way. Because you made an effort to learn about Japan and its people, rather than coming in blind and expecting them to do all the work for you, the Japanese people you encounter will be more hospitable and accepting.

You’ll Have a Deeper Appreciation for Japanese Art and Entertainment

There is no better way to immerse yourself in an ancient society where respect and hierarchy are essential than by learning to speak Japanese. Think about the centuries-old tea ceremony and train yourself to look beyond the stereotypical images of Japan that permeate the internet. The more you immerse yourself in the culture of this great nation, the more you’ll grow as a person and appreciate that Western culture is not the only one out there.

It Creates New Avenues for Travel and Employment

There are several opportunities for natural English speakers, including teaching English and other subjects and tutoring. The Japanese educational system is often regarded as among the world’s greatest and a place where you can always count on receiving the utmost attention and care. As a teacher in the country, you are accorded the same respect as a respected elder. This position grants you access to the country’s most unique and valuable cultural practices.

A Fresh Way of Instruction

Learning these strange characters and their meanings can be challenging, but doing so forces you to think beyond the box. Learning a new language forces you to learn new grammar and pronunciation rules, which can aid you in whatever field you study or pursue for fun. Most students report having studied local philosophy, which has proved invaluable in explaining the prevalence of certain characters.

Establishment of an Entry to Japan’s Financial Markets

Learning Japanese is essential if you want to tap into the local economic climate and trading networks. The Yen is frequently used as a benchmark currency for a good reason. You can learn more about the country’s culture and business practices by speaking with natives if you take the time to learn the language. Before addressing somebody, it’s essential to remember cultural norms and understand appropriate levels of courtesy and social standing. When time is limited, it may seem trivial, but rest assured, it disappears.

Adjusting Usual Social Interactions

People still on the fence about the advantages of Japanese-style partying would do well to investigate the local social scene, fashion, and nightclubs, as well as the unique cultural entertainment that can be found in Japan but nowhere else. Is it worthwhile to study Japanese if one’s sole motivations are leisure and travel? Absolutely! In most Asian cultures, one can expect to make new acquaintances and learn much about social subordination and respect.

Developing Oneself

It’s the most crucial aspect that beginners who focus on the Japanese language and pronunciation tend to overlook. In learning and interacting with people, one develops personally and learns patience. For these reasons, most of the neighbourhood pays close attention whenever you speak. Listening carefully and picking up on the nuances of a speaker’s tone are also vital while communicating in a foreign language. Consider the many Japanese films and commercials. Some may find their Level of sentimentality to be excessive. In reality, all they do is produce the right tonality.

Do I Need to Know Japanese to Visit Japan?

It depends on the circumstances. You can get by in major Japanese cities even if you don’t know the language. There were, however, challenges, such as the highly humiliating necessity of using pantomime to request the restroom.

Tokyo is, by far, the most accessible city in Japan for English speakers. Most signage on the Tokyo Metro is also written in English, making getting about the city a breeze even if you don’t speak Japanese.

Many Japanese words are derived from their English counterparts. You’ll find quite a few of these along your journey, and they’ll surely come in handy at various points.

To what extent should I learn Japanese?

More is always better. That probably goes without saying. Learning Japanese, or any other language, before visiting the nation in question, is an excellent way to gain insight into local customs and traditions.

Languages evolve, and much of what we say depends on our background and experiences. This will significantly enhance your travel experience.

But realistically, learning a language can be highly challenging if you’re only travelling for a week or two at most. As a result, you can take steps to alleviate these conditions:

  • Get started by learning some essential words in the language. Phrase breakdowns will come later. Use your knowledge of forms, colours, and numbers to navigate the transportation system.
  • Get an understanding of Kanji (Japanese Characters of Chinese Origin) to navigate the Japanese language. This is an excellent aid to navigation.
  • To make it easier, getting around independently with technological advances like portable wifi and Google Maps will help you not get lost in the city.
  • Recognise your hotel by its Japanese name. You should bring a hotel business card in case you misplace yours.
  • For regular expenses, it’s helpful to have cash on hand. Nothing beats the convenience and speed of paying cash for most small purchases.
  • Convenience stores can serve as a one-stop shop for all your daily requirements and an essential mental break.
  • When dining out, small talk is all that’s needed. Everyday dining in Japan is geared towards lone warriors and people on the go. Having a meal by oneself is not only acceptable but celebrated.
  • Keep proper etiquette in mind. One piece of advice for a foreign traveller is remembering the basics of polite behaviour.
  • Forty-six letters in the Japanese phonetic alphabet (Katana and Hiragana) can be used to pronounce Japanese words. These are familiar sights, both in and out of public transportation. Extremely useful. If you can only learn one, make it Hiragana, the Japanese alphabet. Foreign borrowed words are referred to as katana.

Conclusion

For better professional opportunities, higher salaries, greater cultural understanding, entry into Japan’s lucrative financial markets, and more, learning Japanese is a must. Not only are personal, professional, and cultural ties to Japan at play here, but also hieroglyphics and calligraphy. Japan is widely utilized in the international business, management, and financial sectors because the country has the world’s third largest economy.

The ability to communicate in Japanese can open doors to new career opportunities, a more outgoing personality, and fresh perspectives on business management.

Because native English speakers can find work in a variety of settings by tutoring and teaching others the language, this opens up additional opportunities for travel and employment.

There are several industries where learning Japanese’s unique grammar and pronunciation standards would be an asset to the student.

It is also important to modify one’s social contacts; learning Japanese helps facilitate meeting new people and gaining an appreciation for the hierarchical and respectful nature of Japanese society. Personal growth and patience are two other qualities that benefit from learning and engaging with others.

While fluency in the Japanese language is not required for a trip to Japan, it is important to familiarize yourself with the local customs and traditions. Most Tokyo Metro signs are also written in English, making it the easiest city in Japan to get around in if you just speak English.

It can be difficult to learn Japanese in a short period of time, such as a week or two spent abroad. However, action must be taken to improve these circumstances so that you can fully appreciate Japan’s special qualities. To get around in Japan, you need to begin by knowing some basic phrases and vocab.

Learn some Kanji, get comfortable with modern conveniences like portable wifi and Google Maps, and study up on hotel names. Keep some cash on hand for day-to-day expenses and use it at convenience stores. Small chat is encouraged at solo diners’ tables in Japan. Keep proper etiquette in mind and learn to pronounce Japanese words using the Katakana and Hiragana phonetic alphabets.

Content Summary

  • You’ve done your research online and know what city you’d like to live in once you move to Japan.
  • You’re thinking, “Should I learn Japanese if I want to go to Japan?”
  • Many people wonder, “Why learn Japanese?”
  • The majority of Japanese language students are motivated to learn the language by personal, professional, or cultural ties to Japan.
  • You only have to think about all the people who translate anime, TV shows, and the cuisine you order at your favorite restaurant to realize how important it is to learn Japanese if you want to have a successful career and fully appreciate all the unique aspects of this fantastic Asian country.
  • There is a lot of debate even among foreigners who have lived in Japan for a long time.
  • There is no clear solution to this problem, but hopefully this blog post will shed some light on where we stand and why.
  • If you work in localisation or a related field, learning a new language will undoubtedly help your career.
  • There are other upsides to studying a foreign language, such as Japanese.
  • Knowing Japanese, the language of the world’s third-largest economy opens doors in international business management and the finance industry.
  • It should come as no surprise that those who can translate between Japanese and other languages are always in demand.
  • In the land of the rising sun, it is common for natives to avoid using foreign languages, including English when conducting business or working with related paperwork.
  • If you know Japanese for business, you will be more valuable to potential employers and customers worldwide.
  • Your potential customers or partners in Japan will appreciate your efforts to learn either business Japanese or even simply the basics of greetings in the language.
  • Learning business Japanese should be something other than your main objective.
  • Even if you only know a little Japanese, it will go a long way.
  • Because you made an effort to learn about Japan and its people, rather than coming in blind and expecting them to do all the work for you, the Japanese people you encounter will be more hospitable and accepting.
  • There is no better way to immerse yourself in an ancient society where respect and hierarchy are essential than by learning to speak Japanese.
  • Think about the centuries-old tea ceremony and train yourself to look beyond the stereotypical images of Japan that permeate the internet.
  • The more you immerse yourself in the culture of this great nation, the more you’ll grow as a person and appreciate that Western culture is not the only one out there.
  • There are several opportunities for natural English speakers, including teaching English and other subjects and tutoring.
  • The Japanese educational system is often regarded as among the world’s greatest and a place where you can always count on receiving the utmost attention and care.
  • As a teacher in the country, you are accorded the same respect as a respected elder.
  • This position grants you access to the country’s most unique and valuable cultural practices.
  • Learning a new language forces you to learn new grammar and pronunciation rules, which can aid you in whatever field you study or pursue for fun.
  • Learning Japanese is essential if you want to tap into the local economic climate and trading networks.
  • You can learn more about the country’s culture and business practices by speaking with natives if you take the time to learn the language.
  • Before addressing somebody, it’s essential to remember cultural norms and understand appropriate levels of courtesy and social standing.
  • People still on the fence about the advantages of Japanese-style partying would do well to investigate the local social scene, fashion, and nightclubs, as well as the unique cultural entertainment that can be found in Japan but nowhere else.
  • Is it worthwhile to study Japanese if one’s sole motivations are leisure and travel?
  • In most Asian cultures, one can expect to make new acquaintances and learn much about social subordination and respect.
  • It’s the most crucial aspect that beginners who focus on the Japanese language and pronunciation tend to overlook.
  • In learning and interacting with people, one develops personally and learns patience.
  • Listening carefully and picking up on the nuances of a speaker’s tone are also vital while communicating in a foreign language.
  • You can get by in major Japanese cities even if you don’t know the language.
  • Tokyo is, by far, the most accessible city in Japan for English speakers.
  • Most signage on the Tokyo Metro is also written in English, making getting about the city a breeze even if you don’t speak Japanese.
  • Many Japanese words are derived from their English counterparts.
  • Learning Japanese, or any other language, before visiting the nation in question, is an excellent way to gain insight into local customs and traditions.
  • Languages evolve, and much of what we say depends on our background and experiences.
  • But realistically, learning a language can be highly challenging if you’re only travelling for a week or two at most.
  • Get started by learning some essential words in the language.
  • Use your knowledge of forms, colours, and numbers to navigate the transportation system.
  • One piece of advice for a foreign traveller is remembering the basics of polite behaviour.
  • Forty-six letters in the Japanese phonetic alphabet (Katana and Hiragana) can be used to pronounce Japanese words.
  • If you can only learn one, make it Hiragana, the Japanese alphabet.

FAQs

Would learning Japanese be practical?

Learning Japanese can be considered a “gateway” to other languages that are very different from English. For instance, learning Chinese, Korean, or Arabic would be simplified by having a foundation in Japanese.

What Level of Japanese do you need to go to Japan?

If you want to travel to Japan with the Japanese language, CEFR A2 (elementary Level) may be your target. At this Level, you can use public transportation, order at local shops, and make reservations and phone calls in Japanese. You will probably have difficulty understanding a native speaker, but you can at least tell them what you want to say.

What are some phrases commonly spoken in Japanese?

The following are some essential, must-know phrases when communicating with Japanese people.

1. Ohayou-gozaimasu (おはようございます): Good morning

2. Kon’nichiwa (こんにちは): Hello (during daytime only)

3. Konbanwa (こんばんは): Good evening/hello (during evening/night)

4. Arigatou gozaimasu (ありがとうございます): Thank you

5. Hai (はい): Yes

6. Iie (いいえ): No

7. Sumimasen (すみません): Excuse me

What do Japanese people do instead of shaking hands?

When greeting someone in Japan, it is traditional to bow. A bow can be as subtle as a nod or as dramatic as a deep bend at the waist. A modest nod of the head is friendly and informal, whereas a deep, lengthy bow conveys respect.

How much of Japan understands English?

English is not widely spoken in Japan, but about 30% of the population is bilingual.

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